Frequently Asked Questions

Industrial Products/Arc Flash Protection
  • Arc Flash Protection

    Question: What arc flash garments do I need when working on 480 volts?
    Answer: While voltage is part of the equation for understanding the hazard, there are other questions which need to be answered in order to understand what your level of hazard will be. Voltage is only a small part of it. A good resource for understanding what HRC hazard risk category clothing you will require for your task is the NFPA 70E 2009 table 130.7(C)(9).

    Question: When our Salisbury arc flash clothing needs to be cleaned, are there any special directions we must follow to do this correctly? Also, how many washings can the garments withstand?
    Answer: There are guidelines to follow when washing the clothes. Normal machine wash and dry is acceptable. However, avoid fabric softeners and bleaches because they may create a build up of chemicals or deteriorate the fabric. WESTEX (manufacturer of Indura Ultra Soft) has washed Indura Ultra Soft garments over 300 cycles without a reduction of any FR properties in tests.

    Question: What is the warranty on insulated tools?
    Answer: Salisbury guarantees the mechanical parts of the tools for life provided they are used for the purpose in which they are intended. Insulation is guaranteed to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of two years from the date of the original shipment by S.I.P. (Salisbury Insulated Products) S.I.P. insulation is guaranteed to pass a 10,000 VAC proof test in accordance with applicable U.S. and International Standards and rated for application to 1000 VAC/1500 VDC. These tools meet or exceed ASTM 1505-07 and IEC Standards for insulated hand tools.

    Question: Why is there a metal zipper on the arc flash protective outerwear?
    Answer: Due to the underflap and overflap of the clothing, there is no potential danger as long as equipment is worn properly. This material was chosen because of its proven durability in extreme climates.

    Question: Can I wear jeans underneath my coveralls?
    Answer: Yes. NFPA 70E requires that the under layer of clothing, not exposed to flame, be made of natural fiber materials. Natural fiber materials have excellent thermal properties. However, as per NFPA 70E 2009, an under-layer of non FR material cannot be used to determine the total protective value of a \"clothing system.\" In order to get a value for a \"clothing system\" all must be FR.

    Question: What is the arc rating on rubber insulating gloves?
    Answer: Currently, there is no approved test standard for determining the arc resistance value of gloves. Salisbury did perform arc testing on gloves using their own test method and the gloves performed very well. (please refer to NFPA 70E 130.7(C)(13)(c)(1) for more information).

    Question: Do I need dielectric rubber boots for arc flash protection?
    Answer: The NFPA 70E standard discusses eliminating step potential. This can be accomplished though the use of rubber matting or dielectric boots. However, this is only for shock protection. For arc flash protection, NFPA 70E 130.7(C)(d) states, \"Heavy duty leather work shoes provide some arc flash protection to the feet and shall be used in all tasks in HRC 2 and higher and in all exposures greater than 4 cal/cm(2).\"

    Question: Can you make a clear faceshield?
    Answer: This could be done, but it would not be accepted by the NFPA 70E standard. The NFPA 70E 2009 standard requires that all face protection meets the ASTM standard F2178.

    Question: How do I clean the AS1200 face shield?
    Answer: Wash the face shield with a mild detergent and water then rinse and dry with a soft cloth or chamois. If required, remove the inner lens at the tab inside top corner and disassemble the frame at the joints. The frame and pivot mechanism is not user serviceable, however these components can be cleaned by washing with a mild detergent under running water then rinse and let air dry.

  • Insulated Hand Tools

    Question: What is the warranty on insulated tools?
    Answer: Salisbury guarantees the mechanical parts of the tools for life provided they are used for the purpose in which they are intended. Insulation is guaranteed to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of two years from the date of the original shipment by S.I.P. (Salisbury Insulated Products) S.I.P. insulation is guaranteed to pass a 10,000 VAC proof test in accordance with applicable U.S. and International Standards and rated for application to 1000 VAC/1500 VDC. These tools meet or exceed ASTM 1505-07 and IEC Standards for insulated hand tools.

    Question: When should insulated tools be re-tested or inspected?
    Answer: Prior to each use, insulated tools should be visually inspected by the end user. If there is any doubt concerning the safety of the tool it should either be scrapped or retested by an independant test lab if necessary.

Standards
  • ASTM

    Question: What is the difference between Type I and Type II gloves?
    Answer: Type I gloves are made of natural rubber and are not considered to be resistant to ozone. Type II gloves are made of a synthetic rubber (EPDM) and are ozone resistant.

    Question: Why are the labels on rubber gloves different colors?
    Answer: The color indicates the class of the glove. This makes it easier for the glove wearer to determine the class of glove that they have. (Refer to Salisbury's Rubber Glove & Sleeve Labeling Chart - available on our website or call Customer Service to place a no-charge order)

    Question: What is the difference between the yellow/black Salisbury overshoes and the red/black overshoes?
    Answer: The yellow/black Salisbury dielectric boots are manufactured and tested in accordance with ASTM F2412 & F2413 and these standards require an electrical dry sample test of the sole. Salisbury's red/black dielectric boots are manufactured to meet the new ASTM F1117 standard and are 100% tested in accordance with the electrical hazard requirements of ASTM F1116.

    Question: Can you make a clear faceshield?
    Answer: This could be done, but it would not be accepted by the NFPA 70E standard. The NFPA 70E 2009 standard requires that all face protection meets the ASTM standard F2178.

    Question: How often do I have to have my electrical gloves re-tested?
    Answer: Rubber insulating gloves issued for service should be tested every 6 months. For further information review ASTM F496.

    Question: Does ASTM require rubber insulating gloves to be date stamped?
    Answer: Date stamping is not a requirement of ASTM D120 but can be a helpful tool for insulating rubber glove wearers or Salisbury authorized distributors to maintain compliance with OSHA.

    Question: Can I write on the gloves with a pen/marker so I can keep track of them?
    Answer: Yes, as long as the ink used does not affect the dielectric properties of the gloves. See ASTM 496, 11.2 for more information.

    Question: How often do I need test rubber insulating blankets?
    Answer: Rubber insulating blankets issued for service should be tested once a year. See ASTM D479 8.1 for more information.

    Question: How often do I need to test line hose?
    Answer: Rubber insulating gloves issued for service should be tested every 6 months. For further information review ASTM F496.

    Question: How often do I need to test ground sets?
    Answer: Grounding sets and jumper sets issued for service should be tested in regularly scheduled time intervals to ensure that defective ground sets and jumper sets are detected and removed from service. See ASTM F2249, 4.4 for more information.

    Question: In order to certify my gloves per ASTM, where can I go?
    Answer: Please visit www.nail4pet.org for a listing of certified independent testing labs that can help with your testing needs.

    Question: Do I need to wear leather protectors over insulating rubber gloves for applications requiring dexterity?
    Answer: ASTM and OSHA allow the use of rubber gloves without leather protectors under certain conditions, but this is not recommended. This also changes the testing schedule for the insulating rubber gloves. See OSHA 1910.137(b)(vii)(A)(B) and ASTM F496, 8.7.4 for more information. However, NFPA 70E does not allow the use of rubber insulating gloves without leather protectors. NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(6)(a) or NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(13)(c)(2)

    Question: Does Salisbury re-certify rubber insulating gloves? Where can we send our gloves to have them retested?
    Answer: Salisbury does not retest gloves, please visit www.nail4pet.org for a listing of certified testing labs that can assist your needs.

    Question: How long can I keep rubber insulating gloves on my shelf? When do I need to have the insulating rubber gloves re-tested?
    Answer: Gloves that have been electrically tested but not issued for service have a shelf life of no more than 12 months before requiring a retest. Once issued into service, they must be re-tested every 6 months. See ASTM F496, 7.1 for more information.

    Question: How often do I need to replace my leather protectors?
    Answer: Leather protectors should be replaced when they are soiled with dirt, grease, oils, and/or have embedded objects, cuts, tears, or other blemishes that may compromise the safety of the gloves.

  • NFPA 70E 2009

    Question: What arc flash garments do I need when working on 480 volts?
    Answer: While voltage is part of the equation for understanding the hazard, there are other questions which need to be answered in order to understand what your level of hazard will be. Voltage is only a small part of it. A good resource for understanding what HRC hazard risk category clothing you will require for your task is the NFPA 70E 2009 table 130.7(C)(9).

    Question: When our Salisbury arc flash clothing needs to be cleaned, are there any special directions we must follow to do this correctly? Also, how many washings can the garments withstand?
    Answer: There are guidelines to follow when washing the clothes. Normal machine wash and dry is acceptable. However, avoid fabric softeners and bleaches because they may create a build up of chemicals or deteriorate the fabric. WESTEX (manufacturer of Indura Ultra Soft) has washed Indura Ultra Soft garments over 300 cycles without a reduction of any FR properties in tests.

    Question: What is the warranty on insulated tools?
    Answer: Salisbury guarantees the mechanical parts of the tools for life provided they are used for the purpose in which they are intended. Insulation is guaranteed to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of two years from the date of the original shipment by S.I.P. (Salisbury Insulated Products) S.I.P. insulation is guaranteed to pass a 10,000 VAC proof test in accordance with applicable U.S. and International Standards and rated for application to 1000 VAC/1500 VDC. These tools meet or exceed ASTM 1505-07 and IEC Standards for insulated hand tools.

    Question: Why is there a metal zipper on the arc flash protective outerwear?
    Answer: Due to the underflap and overflap of the clothing, there is no potential danger as long as equipment is worn properly. This material was chosen because of its proven durability in extreme climates.

    Question: Can I wear jeans underneath my coveralls?
    Answer: Yes. NFPA 70E requires that the under layer of clothing, not exposed to flame, be made of natural fiber materials. Natural fiber materials have excellent thermal properties. However, as per NFPA 70E 2009, an under-layer of non FR material cannot be used to determine the total protective value of a \"clothing system.\" In order to get a value for a \"clothing system\" all must be FR.

    Question: What is the arc rating on rubber insulating gloves?
    Answer: Currently, there is no approved test standard for determining the arc resistance value of gloves. Salisbury did perform arc testing on gloves using their own test method and the gloves performed very well. (please refer to NFPA 70E 130.7(C)(13)(c)(1) for more information).

    Question: Do I need dielectric rubber boots for arc flash protection?
    Answer: The NFPA 70E standard discusses eliminating step potential. This can be accomplished though the use of rubber matting or dielectric boots. However, this is only for shock protection. For arc flash protection, NFPA 70E 130.7(C)(d) states, \"Heavy duty leather work shoes provide some arc flash protection to the feet and shall be used in all tasks in HRC 2 and higher and in all exposures greater than 4 cal/cm(2).\"

    Question: Can you make a clear faceshield?
    Answer: This could be done, but it would not be accepted by the NFPA 70E standard. The NFPA 70E 2009 standard requires that all face protection meets the ASTM standard F2178.

  • Testing

    Question: Does Salisbury electrically test their rubber gloves?
    Answer: Salisbury electrically tests each glove prior to shipment. Each batch of gloves is also subjected to many physical tests in accordance with ASTM D120 standard.

    Question: What type of marker should I use to mark my rubber gloves?
    Answer: A Sharpie or any other brand of marker that uses a mild solvent in their ink. A soft tip should be used to prevent damage to the gloves. The marking should be placed as near to the bead on the cuff as possible.

    Question: What is the difference between Type I and Type II gloves?
    Answer: Type I gloves are made of natural rubber and are not considered to be resistant to ozone. Type II gloves are made of a synthetic rubber (EPDM) and are ozone resistant.

    Question: Why are the labels on rubber gloves different colors?
    Answer: The color indicates the class of the glove. This makes it easier for the glove wearer to determine the class of glove that they have. (Refer to Salisbury's Rubber Glove & Sleeve Labeling Chart - available on our website or call Customer Service to place a no-charge order)

    Question: What is the difference between the yellow/black Salisbury overshoes and the red/black overshoes?
    Answer: The yellow/black Salisbury dielectric boots are manufactured and tested in accordance with ASTM F2412 & F2413 and these standards require an electrical dry sample test of the sole. Salisbury's red/black dielectric boots are manufactured to meet the new ASTM F1117 standard and are 100% tested in accordance with the electrical hazard requirements of ASTM F1116.

    Question: How long can I keep rubber insulating linemen gloves on my shelf and when do I need to send out for re-test?
    Answer: Rubber insulating gloves, which have not been issued have a shelf life of one year. After that time, they will need to be sent to a certified test lab for inspection and dielectric testing or they must be discarded.

    Question: I have linemen gloves that are soiled and still have a valid test date? Are the gloves still good? How can I clean them?
    Answer: Soiled or dirty gloves need to be cleaned properly and then inspected for chemical damage. Rubber insulating gloves can be cleaned by using warm water and a non detergent or non petroleum-based cleaner. Be sure this cleaner does not contain any abrasives. Salisbury recommends the use of Super Salco Cleaner to clean rubber goods. After the gloves are cleaned and dried, carefully inspect the gloves for any sign of chemical or petroleum damage. These will show as either a hard spot or loss of elasticity in most cases.

    Question: How often do I have to have my electrical gloves re-tested?
    Answer: Rubber insulating gloves issued for service should be tested every 6 months. For further information review ASTM F496.

    Question: Are rescue sticks required to be periodically electrically tested?
    Answer: Yes, see OSHA 1910.269(j) for more information.

    Question: Does ASTM require rubber insulating gloves to be date stamped?
    Answer: Date stamping is not a requirement of ASTM D120 but can be a helpful tool for insulating rubber glove wearers or Salisbury authorized distributors to maintain compliance with OSHA.

    Question: I know the ASTM standard governs manufacturing, testing and retesting requirements for insulated rubber gloves, sleeves and blankets, but does the OSHA standard also apply?
    Answer: OSHA enforces ASTM requirements for manufacturing, testing and retesting of gloves in OSHA 1910.137.

    Question: Can I write on the gloves with a pen/marker so I can keep track of them?
    Answer: Yes, as long as the ink used does not affect the dielectric properties of the gloves. See ASTM 496, 11.2 for more information.

    Question: How often do I need test rubber insulating blankets?
    Answer: Rubber insulating blankets issued for service should be tested once a year. See ASTM D479 8.1 for more information.

    Question: How often do I need to test line hose?
    Answer: Line hose issued for service should be electrically tested if a visual inspection indicates the electrical integrity may be compromised. See ASTM F478, 7.1 for more information.

    Question: In order to certify my gloves per ASTM, where can I go?
    Answer: Please visit www.nail4pet.org for a listing of certified independent testing labs that can help with your testing needs.

    Question: Do I need to wear leather protectors over insulating rubber gloves for applications requiring dexterity?
    Answer: ASTM and OSHA allow the use of rubber gloves without leather protectors under certain conditions, but this is not recommended. This also changes the testing schedule for the insulating rubber gloves. See OSHA 1910.137(b)(vii)(A)(B) and ASTM F496, 8.7.4 for more information. However, NFPA 70E does not allow the use of rubber insulating gloves without leather protectors. NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(6)(a) or NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(13)(c)(2)

    Question: Does Salisbury re-certify rubber insulating gloves? Where can we send our gloves to have them retested?
    Answer: Salisbury does not retest gloves, please visit www.nail4pet.org for a listing of certified testing labs that can assist your needs.

    Question: How long can I keep rubber insulating gloves on my shelf? When do I need to have the insulating rubber gloves re-tested?
    Answer: Gloves that have been electrically tested but not issued for service have a shelf life of no more than 12 months before requiring a retest. Once issued into service, they must be re-tested every 6 months. See ASTM F496, 7.1 for more information.

    Question: How often do I need to replace my leather protectors?
    Answer: Leather protectors should be replaced when they are soiled with dirt, grease, oils, and/or have embedded objects, cuts, tears, or other blemishes that may compromise the safety of the gloves.

Utility Products/Shock Protection
  • Gloves & Sleeves

    Question: Does Salisbury electrically test their rubber gloves?
    Answer: Salisbury electrically tests each glove prior to shipment. Each batch of gloves is also subjected to many physical tests in accordance with ASTM D120 standard.

    Question: How do I clean my rubber gloves?
    Answer: Rubber gloves should be stored hanging in a glove bag with the fingers up, not laid flat. Leather protectors should be removed before storing. Store in a dry and cool location (95 degrees F maximum) away from direct sunlight or areas where ozone may be a threat.

    Question: How should I store my rubber gloves?
    Answer: Rubber gloves should be stored hanging in a glove bag with the fingers up, not laid flat. Leather protectors should be removed before storing. Store in a dry and cool location (95 degrees F maximum) away from direct sunlight or areas where ozone may be a threat.

    Question: What type of marker should I use to mark my rubber gloves?
    Answer: A Sharpie or any other brand of marker that uses a mild solvent in their ink. A soft tip should be used to prevent damage to the gloves. The marking should be placed as near to the bead on the cuff as possible.

    Question: What is the difference between Type I and Type II gloves?
    Answer: Type I gloves are made of natural rubber and are not considered to be resistant to ozone. Type II gloves are made of a synthetic rubber (EPDM) and are ozone resistant.

    Question: Why are the labels on rubber gloves different colors?
    Answer: The color indicates the class of the glove. This makes it easier for the glove wearer to determine the class of glove that they have. (Refer to Salisbury's Rubber Glove & Sleeve Labeling Chart - available on our website or call Customer Service to place a no-charge order)

    Question: What can I use to remove the tackiness from my gloves?
    Answer: It is recommended that you use Salisbury's 10-4 glove dust. Just a dusting inside of the gloves just before usage will help.

    Question: Can I use my rubber insulating gloves to change the oil in my car?
    Answer: NO. Rubber insulating gloves can be damaged by petroleum based products and solvents. Rubber insulating gloves should be only used for electrical protection only.

    Question: How long can I keep rubber insulating linemen gloves on my shelf and when do I need to send out for re-test?
    Answer: Rubber insulating gloves, which have not been issued have a shelf life of one year. After that time, they will need to be sent to a certified test lab for inspection and dielectric testing or they must be discarded.

    Question: I have linemen gloves that are soiled and still have a valid test date? Are the gloves still good? How can I clean them?
    Answer: Soiled or dirty gloves need to be cleaned properly and then inspected for chemical damage. Rubber insulating gloves can be cleaned by using warm water and a non detergent or non petroleum-based cleaner. Be sure this cleaner does not contain any abrasives. Salisbury recommends the use of Super Salco Cleaner to clean rubber goods. After the gloves are cleaned and dried, carefully inspect the gloves for any sign of chemical or petroleum damage. These will show as either a hard spot or loss of elasticity in most cases.

  • Grounding Equipment

    Question: Are rescue sticks required to be periodically electrically tested?
    Answer: Yes, see OSHA 1910.269(j) for more information.

    Question: How often do I need to test ground sets?
    Answer: Grounding sets and jumper sets issued for service should be tested in regularly scheduled time intervals to ensure that defective ground sets and jumper sets are detected and removed from service. See ASTM F2249, 4.4 for more information.

    Question: What is the optimum torque level for ground clamps?
    Answer: Torque application should not exceed 25 ft*lbs. 20 to 25 ft*lbs is suggested.

  • Hot Sticks & Tools

    Question: Are rescue sticks required to be periodically electrically tested?
    Answer: Yes, see OSHA 1910.269(j) for more information.

  • Insulated Jumpers

    Question: How often do I need to test ground sets?
    Answer: Grounding sets and jumper sets issued for service should be tested in regularly scheduled time intervals to ensure that defective ground sets and jumper sets are detected and removed from service. See ASTM F2249, 4.4 for more information.

  • Insulating Blankets

    Question: I know the ASTM standard governs manufacturing, testing and retesting requirements for insulated rubber gloves, sleeves and blankets, but does the OSHA standard also apply?
    Answer: OSHA enforces ASTM requirements for manufacturing, testing and retesting of gloves in OSHA 1910.137.

    Question: How often do I need test rubber insulating blankets?
    Answer: Rubber insulating blankets issued for service should be tested once a year. See ASTM D479 8.1 for more information.

    Question: Is there a certain side of the blanket a lineman should place on the conductor or energized equipment to insulate it?
    Answer: There are no requirements in ASTM F479 or OSHA 1910.137 regarding the in-service care of insulating blankets regarding the proper side of the blanket to use.

  • Insulators

    Question: Does Salisbury offer any dead-end insulators?
    Answer: Yes. Salisbury offers a 15kV, 25kV, and a 35kV version. These insulators are RUS accepted.

  • Line Hose & Covers

    Question: How often do I need to test line hose?
    Answer: Line hose issued for service should be electrically tested if a visual inspection indicates the electrical integrity may be compromised. See ASTM F478, 7.1 for more information.

    Question: What is SALCOR?
    Answer: Salisbury's SALCOR rubber formula is made of Type II rubber and was designed for increased versatility and flexibility in special cover-up situations. All conventional style and straight style line hose are made with SALCOR.

  • Outage Protection

    Question: What do Stinger Covers protect from?
    Answer: Salisbury stinger covers protect against phase to phase and phase to ground wildlife contacts. These covers are RUS approved.

    Question: How can I install Bushing Covers?
    Answer: Salisbury's bushing covers can be installed without disconnecting equipment using rubber insulating gloves. Some bushing covers will require disconnecting the power for installation. Please contact your local Salisbury Representative if needed for clarity on which bushing cover you possess.

  • Plastic Guards & Covers

    Question: Is there any advantage to the conductor cover \"connector stop?\"
    Answer: The unique connector stop is molded into one end of the conductor cover. This prevents covers from overlapping during installation which eliminates wasted time when trucks have to be moved to reconnect sections that did not couple (connect) correctly. These connector stops are only available on the 35kV version.

    Question: What if I have a need for a special cover not offered in the Salisbury catalog?
    Answer: Please contact your local Regional Sales Manager. In some cases, Salisbury may be able to assist with special requests.

  • Protective Footwear

    Question: What is the difference between the yellow/black Salisbury overshoes and the red/black overshoes?
    Answer: The yellow/black Salisbury dielectric boots are manufactured and tested in accordance with ASTM F2412 & F2413 and these standards require an electrical dry sample test of the sole. Salisbury's red/black dielectric boots are manufactured to meet the new ASTM F1117 standard and are 100% tested in accordance with the electrical hazard requirements of ASTM F1116.

    Question: Do I need dielectric rubber boots for arc flash protection?
    Answer: The NFPA 70E standard discusses eliminating step potential. This can be accomplished though the use of rubber matting or dielectric boots. However, this is only for shock protection. For arc flash protection, NFPA 70E 130.7(C)(d) states, \"Heavy duty leather work shoes provide some arc flash protection to the feet and shall be used in all tasks in HRC 2 and higher and in all exposures greater than 4 cal/cm(2).\"

  • Voltage Detectors

    Question: When using the Salisbury voltage detector, how will I know when voltage is present?
    Answer: Salisbury's voltage detector is unique in that it indicates the presence of voltage with a LED light and a distinctive audible signal.

    Question: Does the Salisbury Audio/Visual Voltage Detector require any periodic calibration to ensure that the device is accurate and safe?
    Answer: Six standard detectors are available. Product\r\nnumber 4244, 4344 and 4444 are our\r\nstandard models. Numbers 4544, 4644 and\r\n4744 feature a self test function. \r\n\r\nSelf test models have a continuous flashing light and\r\nbeep to indicate that the batteries are charged\r\nand the unit is functioning properly including\r\nthe detection circuit and the light and\r\nbuzzer.\r\n\r\nIt is good practice to test the detector prior each use in order to make sure that the unit is working properly.\r\n\r\nYou can purchase our Voltage Detector Tester part #4445 for the testing of the standard models.

    Question: Can voltage detectors pick up DC voltage?
    Answer: No